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Brown is the new black


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Soupe de Potimarron au beurre noisette (pumpkin soup with sage brown butter)

Potimarron

*This is an old post from the Chez Pim archives.  I’m a little bit overwhelmed at the moment, so hopefully this season-appropriate post from last year can keep you occupied for a bit until I’m back here chez moi.*

This is a pumpkin with many names.  It’s called Potimarron in French, or Hokkaido Squash in English, or Kuri Pumpkin (from Uchiki Kuri in Japanese), I’ve also heard it referred to as Chestnut Pumpkin, or even Red-skin Kabocha.  I first encountered it in France, where the name Potimarron combined the two words Potiron, for pumpkin, and Marron, for chestnut, which are the two characteristic flavors of this particular pumpkin.  Or is it a squash?  I never can tell the difference.  Perhaps someone could enlighten me?

Potimarron –which, yes, by any other name would be as delicious- makes a perfect bowl of soup.  The cooked flesh is sweet but much less so than its cousin Kabocha, making it perfect for a savory soup, and the chestnut flavor adds an unexpected complexity to the simple soup.  It’s also so very easy to make, using just a few ingredients, and doesn’t require any tool more sophisticated than a hand blender or a normal blender to make a perfectly smooth soup. 

You could also puree it with a tiny amount of cream, like we did when in Mougins last year.  The puree was perfectly silky without needing a few passes through the Chinois.  We paired the gorgeous orange purée with just as gorgeous seared foie gras.

This time, I made the simple soup to warm a cool day and garnished with a handful of croutons and a few drops of sage brown butter.  How simple, and how delicious.

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What plant is this?

What is this?

Do you know what this is? I’ll give you a clue, it’s edible, delicious even.

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A wife-saving kitchen, anyone?

Timenmotionkitchen

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Auto Vacuum Freezer Ice Cream, anyone?

Autovacuumfreezer

I’ve stumbled on an old copy of the Boston Cooking School Cook Book from 1923, by none other than Fannie Merritt Farmer of that revered classic. Besides the interesting content, which I’ll be writing about later I’m sure, the book is a treasure trove of old food ads. I’m going to be posting a few of them in the coming days. (I’ve got a bit of a computer issue at the moment so no long posts from me for a few more days.)

This one, for example, is an ad for a contraption to make ice cream. I wonder what it’s all about. Something perhaps related to using liquid nitrogen which, strangely enough, is hardly new at all.

I’ve tried to find more information about this particular contraption on the web, but so far my search has turned up nothing. Has anyone heard of this company? Do you know what this Vacuum Freezer thing is exactly?

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